The Say of a Student

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The Say of a Student

Ava Hawkes, Staff Writer

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Teachers hold an important place in American life. They shape the future of our children; by extension, they shape the next generation. Because of this, many think that teachers’ job performance should be judged by students. Plainly and simply, this would be disastrous. By putting someone’s livelihood in the hands of those who are less mature, we risk losing valuable instructors and elevating children to a level they should not occupy.

A student’s reasoning for disliking a certain teacher often doesn’t extend past “They gave me a bad grade.” This neglects the fact that bad grades are earned, not given; in other words, students have a tendency to blame teachers for their own failures. If a teacher’s job relies on student surveys, their livelihood may rest in the hands of children with a vendetta.

By putting students in the ultimate position of “the judge,” they’re elevated to a level that is completely inappropriate for them to occupy. Students should not be the one dictating who instructs them. If they did, every single one would pass with an A+. Students are bound to leave negative reviews of teachers with rigorous course work, and by that same measure, bound to leave positive reviews of teachers with lighter course work that guarantees a good grade. The question comes down to this: should we let kids grade themselves?

The answer is no. While student opinion is valuable and important, it should never be the deciding factor when a supervisor reviews a teacher. Humans in general find it difficult to make objective judgement in any situation. Leaving objective judgement in the hands of young minds without maturity would be disastrous for their own education. Easy teachers would dominate while those who actually want to make a difference would be out of a job because their difficult work garnered a negative review. If we want our youth to improve, to be enlightened, we must not let them make education easier for themselves.